Non-COSC certified Omega’s

Hey Ray, how do u do ?

I would like to ask, most of the Omegas I saw from the 50s or 60s, they do not have the COSC print on it, including the Speedmaster as well. Were they like Patek in the sense that their standard was better than COSC or that their watches were not COSC certified ?

Thanks!

This is an email I received from a subscriber just this morning.

There are a number of reasons for this, primary of which is the fact that COSC in its current form was only established in 1973, so watches prior to this could not have the COSC print on it.

Prior to this watch movements could be tested and certified as Chronometer’s but movements were tested collectively and did not receive individual certificates.

At the moment, only about 3% of Swiss watch production is submitted for certification. To me this is more of a nice marketing gimmick than of any practical use.

Firstly, most watch brands – even your humble Seiko or Citizen comes with that level of accuracy when a watch leaves the factory and the Grand Seiko has an even stricter standard than that employed by COSC.

Secondly, fine regulation and chronometer characteristics of a watch can be destroyed in seconds by a rough and inexperienced hand.

If you are buying a previously owned watch – especially from a watch dealer, it is very likely that it has been opened for a service or repair and you can no longer be sure of where it has been or what was done to it so the certification is almost useless.

Third and last, considering the fact that mechanical watches are almost never used for real timekeeping and navigation any more, certification may be considered unnecessary.

 

cool…i got it now, awesome response! maybe one day we can meet up and you can guide me further in the world of horology…

2 Comments Posted

  1. cool…i got it now, awesome response! maybe one day we can meet up and you can guide me further in the world of horology…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*